Day Questions

My sister’s marriage took place with a man who suffers from acute schizophrenia, but his family never told us about his illness. This is a mental disease that is incurable. After coming to know about his mental condition my sister left him. The marriage was never consummated, and they have been living separately for one-and-a-half years. What options does she have to get out of this situation?

If the mentioned person is ill in such a way that he loses his mind and he is considered to be insane, by acting in a way that sane people do not act, even for a limited period of time, then the wife has the right to annul the marriage. Otherwise, the marriage can only be ended through the husband divorcing the wife. However, if the wife is willing to live with him and undertake her religious obligations to him and the husband is not willing to maintain her and provide for her, then the religious authority, the marja, can divorce the wife in this particular case if the husband refuses to divorce her.

How do we explain the punishments imposed by the Sharia for various crimes, such as the death penalty for apostates, while the Quran says that there is no compulsion in religion?

Applying the Sharia-defined punishments is the duty of the Prophet and the Imams (peace be upon them). No doubt, applying them is a form of justice and not an oppressive act. The punishment is set in the Sharia after the evidence is established and becomes clear in such a way that the noncompliant is considered as an oppressor against himself and the society. As such, the Sharia-defined punishment is not considered against human rights. The verse alluded to refers to the fact that the religion is based on beliefs, and beliefs are not imposed, and does not indicate that there is no punishment imposed by the Sharia for disbelief out of stubbornness and transgression.